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The XXXII Reunión Nacional de Suelos organized by researchers from the field of edaphology belonging to the University of Seville and the Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville (IRNAS-CSIC) took place in Seville (Spain) on 10-13 September 2019. This meeting is an initiative of the Spanish Society of Soil Science (SECS) that has been taking place since 1973 as they organize excursions to get to know different Spanish soils.

The meeting began with a session of posters and presentations framed within different themes (see Abstracts Book). Within the theme of “Study and recovery of contaminated soils” Marta Gil Martínez, predoctoral researcher at IRNAS-CSIC, presented a study on the fungal functional diversity in trace element contaminated soils from the Guadiamar Green Corridor.

In this study, the soil fungal communities were analyzed with a methodology of next generation sequencing in soils with different levels of contamination by trace elements and with different plant covers. The results showed that the phytoremediation plan established after the Aznalcóllar mining accident has favored the development of fungal communities by increasing their species richness and diversity. Both the type of vegetation covers and the properties of the soil determine the structure of the fungal communities. Under the poplar and pine trees, the communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi dominate, and under the wild olive and herbaceous species dominate arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, due to the specific symbiosis of each type of vegetation with the fungi.

Access to the poster in this link:

Gil-Martínez M, López-García Á, Navarro-Fernández CM, Domínguez MT, Marañón T (2019). Fungal functional diversity in trace element contaminated soils from the Guadiamar Green Corridor. XXXII Reunión Nacional de Suelos (Seville).

In the following days we made three diverse and representative itineraries of the main soils and landscapes of Western Andalusia: 1) a protected and unique space in Europe, Doñana National Park; 2) a global example of restoration such as the Guadiamar Green Corridor, a protected area after the Aznalcóllar mining disaster, and finally 3) the Mediterranean soils of the valley and countryside of Carmona.

In the Doñana National Park, the researcher Luis Clemente (IRNAS-CSIC) explained the types of soils and the various ecosystems that Doñana include. In the Guadiamar Green Corridor we visited the Aznalcóllar mine and the researchers María Teresa Domínguez (University of Seville) and Engracia Madejón (IRNAS-CSIC) explained the details of the accident and the studies that have been carried out since then. In Carmona, we study two soil profiles with the help of Antonio Jordán (University of Seville).

 

The Iberian Ecological Society SIBECOL has just been established to gather professional scientist from Portugal and Spain from all ecology areas: theoretical, terrestrial, marine and continental waters. Its main aim is promoting ecology and to give visibility to scientific works in all these fields.

To celebrate the establishment of the society and to share the scientific progress in ecology, last 4th -7th of February the First SIBECOL Congress, as well as the XIV AEET Meeting, were celebrated. The venue selected was the Faculty of Biology at the University of Barcelona (Spain).

This congress was celebrated in an emblematic time and place due to the commemoration, this year 2019, of the centenary of Professor Ramon Margalef. Margalef became one of the most relevant ecologist of the XX century and the first professor of Ecology in Spain at the University of Barcelona, where all the Iberian ecologist had the opportunity to meet.

INTARSU Project did not want to miss this important event for ecology and we had the opportunity of presenting our last study in a poster titled: “Phytostabilisation of trace elements with different tree species revealed a species-specific effect on soil functioning”. This work has been possible thanks to the collaboration between researchers from IRNAS-CSIC, University of Sevilla and University of Reading (United Kingdom). The poster was presented in the Thematic Session 14 “Organisms and ecosystem responses to global change in soils and sediments”, organized by the Group of Plant-Soil Interactions of AEET.

In this study, we presented the effects of different tree species (white poplar, wild olive and stone pine) on biotic and abiotic soil properties. The study area, known as Guadiamar Green Corridor (Seville), suffered in 1998 a serious contamination due to Aznalcóllar mine-spill. After a remediation plan in the whole affected area, different tree and shrubs species were planted, and 15 years after these trees have generated soil changes. In relation to soil nutrients, we have found that the tree coverage has increased fertility in soils underneath compared to soils covered by herbaceous plants. Among the studied species, white poplar trees have helped to neutralize soil pH; however, stone pine trees have acidified the soil which is undesirable as acidity increases soil trace element availability. Soil microbial activity presented differences among tree species and we found that enzyme activities with an important role in C, N and P cycles were highly dependent on soil pH. To summarise, we have found a tree species effect on abiotic and biotic soil properties with direct consequences on soil functioning.

Gil-Martínez, Marta; Domínguez, María Teresa; Navarro-Fernández, Carmen María; Tibbett, Mark; Marañón, Teodoro (2019). Phytostabilisation of trace elements with different tree species revealed a species-specific effect on soil functioning. In: Abstract book. 1st Meeting of the Iberian Ecological Society & XIV AEET Meeting. Ecology: an integrative science in the Anthropocene. February 4-7, 2019, Barcelona (Spain), page 269. AEET, Madrid, DOI: 10.7818/SIBECOLandAEETmeeting.2019.