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The Iberian Ecological Society SIBECOL has just been established to gather professional scientist from Portugal and Spain from all ecology areas: theoretical, terrestrial, marine and continental waters. Its main aim is promoting ecology and to give visibility to scientific works in all these fields.

To celebrate the establishment of the society and to share the scientific progress in ecology, last 4th -7th of February the First SIBECOL Congress, as well as the XIV AEET Meeting, were celebrated. The venue selected was the Faculty of Biology at the University of Barcelona (Spain).

This congress was celebrated in an emblematic time and place due to the commemoration, this year 2019, of the centenary of Professor Ramon Margalef. Margalef became one of the most relevant ecologist of the XX century and the first professor of Ecology in Spain at the University of Barcelona, where all the Iberian ecologist had the opportunity to meet.

INTARSU Project did not want to miss this important event for ecology and we had the opportunity of presenting our last study in a poster titled: “Phytostabilisation of trace elements with different tree species revealed a species-specific effect on soil functioning”. This work has been possible thanks to the collaboration between researchers from IRNAS-CSIC, University of Sevilla and University of Reading (United Kingdom). The poster was presented in the Thematic Session 14 “Organisms and ecosystem responses to global change in soils and sediments”, organized by the Group of Plant-Soil Interactions of AEET.

In this study, we presented the effects of different tree species (white poplar, wild olive and stone pine) on biotic and abiotic soil properties. The study area, known as Guadiamar Green Corridor (Seville), suffered in 1998 a serious contamination due to Aznalcóllar mine-spill. After a remediation plan in the whole affected area, different tree and shrubs species were planted, and 15 years after these trees have generated soil changes. In relation to soil nutrients, we have found that the tree coverage has increased fertility in soils underneath compared to soils covered by herbaceous plants. Among the studied species, white poplar trees have helped to neutralize soil pH; however, stone pine trees have acidified the soil which is undesirable as acidity increases soil trace element availability. Soil microbial activity presented differences among tree species and we found that enzyme activities with an important role in C, N and P cycles were highly dependent on soil pH. To summarise, we have found a tree species effect on abiotic and biotic soil properties with direct consequences on soil functioning.

Gil-Martínez, Marta; Domínguez, María Teresa; Navarro-Fernández, Carmen María; Tibbett, Mark; Marañón, Teodoro (2019). Phytostabilisation of trace elements with different tree species revealed a species-specific effect on soil functioning. In: Abstract book. 1st Meeting of the Iberian Ecological Society & XIV AEET Meeting. Ecology: an integrative science in the Anthropocene. February 4-7, 2019, Barcelona (Spain), page 269. AEET, Madrid, DOI: 10.7818/SIBECOLandAEETmeeting.2019.

Last September, the 12th International Conference on Mine Closure was celebrated in Leipzig (Germany). This conference, organized by the Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, is one of the world`s reference events among the mine closure professionals. The main conference topics that were discussed and that have been found as the main issues were:  establishing integrated life of mine planning, design sustainable land uses from the social and environmental perspective, increasing the post-mining assets value, and establishing  stable and self-regenerating ecosystems, among others.

Due to the urgent necessity of improving reclamation of mining areas, abandoned and/ or in transition to close, researchers from IRNAS-CSIC, University of Seville, University of Reading and Haute École Condorcet have collaborated to present a paper and an oral communication in this conference.

Gil-Martínez M, Domínguez MT, Navarro-Fernández CM, Crompot H, Tibbett M , Marañón T (2018). Long-term effects of trace elements contamination on soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities, in C Drebenstedt, F von Bismarck, A Fourie & M Tibbett (eds), Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Mine Closure, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany, pp. 633-644.

Results from the applied strategy of phytostabilisation on mining areas contaminated by heavy metals were presented. In our study area known as Guadiamar Green Corridor, where phytostabilisation have happened over 19 years, forestation has been found to improve soil fertility and microbial biomass, which is an indicator of improved soil quality. Moreover, different tree species have been found to affect soil chemistry and biology in different ways. White poplar was found to increase soil pH and to recover nutrients levels. However, stone pine was found to acidify the soil, increasing heavy metal availability and reducing microbial communities. In conclusion, previous to forestation is recommended to select the most suitable species for the specific conditions of the mining area to reclaim.

In this conference, Marta Gil-Martínez, predoctoral researcher from IRNAS-CSIC, had the opportunity to visit the Wismut Uranium Tailings Remediation Project , which started back in 1991 and currently clean-up, re-contouring and implementation of covers tasks are still in place. Last cover consists in revegetation to establish some forest and pastures areas, in order to maximize biodiversity.